The Sand Flush Experiment – Final Results

From our five day test (at the recommended dosage of 2 scoops for a 500kg horse), I was not too pleased with the results.

Palatability

While marketed as an attractive feed for your steed, mine would not touch it without adding molasses. However, as a rebuttal, there is lots of evidence in the number of owners on Facebook groups and forums that praise the lord that their horse has eaten it without any fuss what so ever. Mine must just be a picky bugger.

Effect on the Horse’s Comfort

I definitely found that from the first to the second day, my gelding had a lot of discomfort in his stomach as the psyllium was passing through. Perhaps this is the ideal effect, however I did not like having him flinch as I touched his round, hard tummy. I believe that any attempt of riding in this period would have ended up with me meeting gravity’s effect, and him being an upset pony.

Amount of Product

What really annoyed me was that the bag (claiming to be 650 grams worth) did not hold the actual amount. On the last day, despite careful measuring every previous day, I was only left with one and maybe a half (if that) cups of Sand Flush left. For the extremely high price ($46.50 from my local stockfeeders & that was the cheapest price I could find) I would expect to have the full dosage as the package states to claim.

Evidence of Sand Removal

Does this remove as much as a drench? I assume not. To be honest, to justify the price tag… I expected more. Yeah, yeah maybe I’m picky – hey this upsets me too – I read lots of positive comments about this stuff, but I think it was more in the palatability it provided – normal psyllium husk has been on the market for ages. When I was using Sand Flush, I found that the amount of sand pooped out was about average for my horse.

Would I Buy It Again?

Me? No. The main attractiveness was that the horse would eat it without fuss, where as normal psyllium husk had to be drenched with molasses to even get a mouthful in. As my horse didn’t eat this anyway, I won’t be buying it again.

BUT, and that’s a big BUTT (Cos he’s a quarterhorse, geddit) – this DOES NOT mean that it won’t work for your horse. Every darn horse is different, hence why it’s so darn difficult to own them! I’ve heard of this product emptying sand like nothing – there are thousands of reasons why it didn’t work on mine and did work on yours. Some horses naturally remove sand easier than others. There are so many ways that this experiment isn’t completely accurate as it wasn’t laboratory or university standard test conditions – it was a backyard experiment, to do with a recently-turned-sand-prevention-fanatic and her completely confused gelding (“Why does my owner keep turning up in the morning with molasses…something’s fishy here… but OOH MOLASSES!”).

Alternatives?

Well, my next test is pumpkin! If I haven’t lost you already 😉

But psyllium husk is a known sand mover – there is scientific evidence for that. Murdoch University (Horse Hospital) uses psyllium in their drenches. So, I’m not saying it’s a waste of time! No way! Anything that can help a horse move sand in WA is a god-send! I’m just saying, if you’re the average working Aussie, trying to balance your horses with your bank account, give normal good old psyllium husk a go. If they don’t eat it, grate up carrots, pop molasses in it, whatever – and then if they really don’t eat it then try the Sand Flush (as people have had success with it! I’m just an unlucky one I think). Where you can save a few bucks & get the same result, I’d give it a go.

And of course, the good old drench. There’s pros and cons but in certain parts of WA, I think drenches are the best preventative you can try, and at regular intervals.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s